Posts by: Ségolène Tarte
Whilst this blog has been dormant for the last few years, work has continued. The outcomes of the fellowship that prompted me to start this research blog  are presented in the following paper: http://www.hrionline.ac.uk/openbook/chapter/dhc2012-tarte, (published in 2014). In a nutshell, the core of this work consisted in identifying a range of strategies that experts deploy when reading and […]
Lire la suite...
September has been a very busy month, where I spent most of my time at conferences: Digital Humanities Congress at Sheffield (6th-8th Sept 2012) Digital Research at Oxford (10th-12th Sept) Perspectives workshop on Computing and Palaeography at Scholss Dagstuhl, Germany (18th-21st Sept) Materiality of Texts conference at Durham (24th-26th Sept) I have to say that […]
Lire la suite...
Expert (Chambers Dictionary of Etymology) What do expertise and expert performance have to do with this digital curation of knowledge creation project? Well, if I can understand better what expertise is, where it comes from, and how it is constituted, I will have armed myself with a very valuable tool to identify how experts in […]
Lire la suite...
100-meters-starting-blocks-2007-pan-am-games Leaving the starting blocks This is where it all starts. Today is officially the first day of my fellowship, and I need to get myself into gear and out of those starting blocks. I’ve done cross-disciplinary work before, but here, I’m flying solo – or almost, as I thankfully have a mentor, and an advisory […]
Lire la suite...
Back from Würzburg, where I attended the « Digital Palaeography » ESF exploratory workshop – and on which Dr. Dominique Stutzmann reports in his blog – I find myself pondering on issues of public vs private research. Youtie, times before the widespread adoption of digital tools, already commented on this issue in the context of papyrology. In […]
Lire la suite...
To create a blog

To create a blog

To create your own blog, you only have to fill a registration form. Hypotheses is open to the whole academic community: researchers, lecturers, information specialists, librarians, etc. in all humanities and social sciences disciplines.
Hypotheses

Hypotheses

Hypotheses is a publication platform for academic blogs in the humanities and social sciences by the  Centre for Open Electronic Publishing.
About Academic blog

About Academic blog

It is a fast and light publishing mode that allows researchers to provide real-time updates of developments in their own research. Research blogs come in numerous forms: seminar proceedings; accounts of collective research, fieldwork, or archaeological excavations; journal blogs opening up debate to a broader community; discussions forums for research or book projects; research notes; photo blogs, etc. It enables bloggers to interact with readers through comments. It is a simple user-friendly tool that does not require any specialist IT knowledge.