Posts by: Ségolène Tarte
September has been a very busy month, where I spent most of my time at conferences: Digital Humanities Congress at Sheffield (6th-8th Sept 2012) Digital Research at Oxford (10th-12th Sept) Perspectives workshop on Computing and Palaeography at Scholss Dagstuhl, Germany (18th-21st Sept) Materiality of Texts conference at Durham (24th-26th Sept) I have to say that […]
Read more...
Expert (Chambers Dictionary of Etymology) What do expertise and expert performance have to do with this digital curation of knowledge creation project? Well, if I can understand better what expertise is, where it comes from, and how it is constituted, I will have armed myself with a very valuable tool to identify how experts in […]
Read more...
100-meters-starting-blocks-2007-pan-am-games Leaving the starting blocks This is where it all starts. Today is officially the first day of my fellowship, and I need to get myself into gear and out of those starting blocks. I’ve done cross-disciplinary work before, but here, I’m flying solo – or almost, as I thankfully have a mentor, and an advisory […]
Read more...
Back from Würzburg, where I attended the « Digital Palaeography » ESF exploratory workshop – and on which Dr. Dominique Stutzmann reports in his blog – I find myself pondering on issues of public vs private research. Youtie, times before the widespread adoption of digital tools, already commented on this issue in the context of papyrology. In […]
Read more...
About Academic blog

About Academic blog

It is a fast and light publishing mode that allows researchers to provide real-time updates of developments in their own research. Research blogs come in numerous forms: seminar proceedings; accounts of collective research, fieldwork, or archaeological excavations; journal blogs opening up debate to a broader community; discussions forums for research or book projects; research notes; photo blogs, etc. It enables bloggers to interact with readers through comments. It is a simple user-friendly tool that does not require any specialist IT knowledge.
Hypotheses

Hypotheses

Hypotheses is a publication platform for academic blogs in the humanities and social sciences by the  Centre for Open Electronic Publishing.
To create a blog

To create a blog

To create your own blog, you only have to fill a registration form. Hypotheses is open to the whole academic community: researchers, lecturers, information specialists, librarians, etc. in all humanities and social sciences disciplines.
Carnets de recherche