Author: Lisa Smith

Something to Share: Food from Home to Home

By Megan Daigle, with Maria Wilby and Iman Mortagy Food brings people together. That simple idea is …

Tales from the Archives:

I am a homesick Canadian in the UK at this time of year. This coming weekend is Thanksgiving and I…

Receiving Alchemical Knowledge

By Margaret Maurer On two of the last leaves of receipt book compiled by Margarett Baker in the late…

King Calli’s Spruce Beer

By Renée Lafferty-Salhany Cocktails today, in expert hands, are an art form.  The thoughtful, delibe…

Dr. Chase

By Mandy Aftel In early America, settlers on an expanding frontier had to rely on their own skills a…

Fairgoing Filipino Food in the Fifties

By R. Alexander Orquiza In 1950, the cooking demonstrations at the California State Fair were a way …

Medieval charms: magical and religious remedies

By Véronique Soreau Charms are incantations or magic spells, chanted, recited, or written. Used to cure diseases, they can also be a type of medical recipe.[1]  Such recipes were often described as charms in their title and linked to a ritualistic form of language intertwined with religion, medicine and magic.…

Tales from the Archives: Love Magic in Eighteenth-Century Russia

In 2017, The Recipes Project celebrated its fifth birthday. We now have nearly 650 posts in our archives and over 160 pages for readers to sift through. That’s a lot of material! (And thank you so much to our contributors for sharing such a wealth of knowledge on recipes.) But with so…

How an American Became ‘The French Chef’

By Juliet Tempest There can be no better description of Julia Child than “meticulous.” Indeed, Amy Vidor and Caroline Barta describe her thus in their delightful post this month. They review the history of Child’s success in circulating French cuisine in the U.S. As they discuss, Child held the highest…